Pour accéder à toutes les fonctionnalités de ce site, vous devez activer JavaScript. Voici les instructions pour activer JavaScript dans votre navigateur Web.

Looking right then left... then right again
Read the text | Diaporama | Back to gallery

  • Looking right then left... then right again
  • Looking right then left... then right again
  • Looking right then left... then right again
  • Looking right then left... then right again
  • Looking right then left... then right again
  • Looking right then left, then right again
  • Looking right then left... then right again
  • Looking right then left... then right again
  • Looking right then left... then right again
  • Looking right then left... then right again
  • Looking right then left... then right again
  • Looking right then left... then right again
  • Vue de l'exposition à la Centurion Box Gallery de Douvres, 2009
  • Vue de l'exposition à la gare de Saint-Omer, 2009
  • Vue de l'exposition à la gare de Saint-Omer, 2009
  • Vue de l'exposition "Achemar" à la gare Saint-Sauveur, Lille, 2014

  • This series has been shot during my residency at Espace 36 (Saint-Omer - F) and DAD (Dover Arts Development, GB)

    Size 100 x 123 cm

     

    - The narrow strip of sea which forms the Channel captures the imagination ... invoking a feeling that is  somewhere between dreaming, hope and anxiety.

    - Walkers out for the day, tourists, inhabitants, migrants, sports fans or commuters, each with their aspirations and desires when looking across from the French or English coast: making out the other side, going there, settling there, reconstructing oneself there ... residing there

    - The title of the series alludes to the instructions at pedestrian crossings and invokes at the same time the act of crossing, its risks, its dangers, but also its pleasures.

    - The photographs show men and women of different ages and origins, from both sides of the Channel, indoors, next to a window, facing a net curtain, a marine horizon...

    - The photographs are not portraits but anonymous figures placed according to a protocol for the shoot: a set distance from the subject placed with his or her back to the photographer or in profile, facing an opening which lets in the light, slow shutter speed, low, frontal viewpoint ...

    - Each image is both autonomous and part of a series. The whole series itself forms a single image, all-encompasing, multiple, monumental and more complex. It reveals a diverse, silent human community brought together for an instant in front of a large imaginary window: an artificial panorama opening out beyond the cliffs of Kent and the Pas-de-Calais.

    - The anonymous figures are observed observers of invisible events located out-of-field, beyond the window and outside the frame. They invite us to enter into and become part of the group, to discover that which the photograph refuses to deliver ... and puts us in turn into the position of witness or dreamer.

    - The silence of the images disturbs our own silence. The whole series contains a hint of suspicion.

    - Certain elements and details keep catching the gaze: the incisive cut of a T-shirt sleeve, a lamp turned on in full daylight, a Palestinian  Kaffiyeh used as a belt, a western scarf sketching out the rolling of a turban, an  artificial landscape on a computer screen, the crossing of feet, a ring ... a big net curtain hung outdoors.

    - Real and imaginary, closeness and remoteness, colour and monochrome, permanently cohabit in the individual photographic images and in the series.

    - The net curtain present in many of the photographs can be perceived as a setting, a filter, an artifice of the photographer ... or all three at the same time. It can be seen as making up the fittings inside a home, a museum ... or it could have been taken along by the photographer himself, discreetly, illusively, visibly  or whimsically.

    - The rare visual escape routes beyond the sphere of the interior are reserved for subjects who are disenfranchised, namely migrants destined to the roving and violence of exile.

    - The images allow us to guess at intimate lives sometimes chosen and achieved, sometimes endured; ranging from western comfort to the experience of alternative lifestyles and states of wandering. They bring into appearance the dissonant hues of outdated and enveloping harmonies. Everything nonetheless works together and forms only a single image.

    - “Looking right then left, then right again” suggests a world of the present; a society which is transient, suspicious and anxious about itself, but also a community that is silent, alert, knowing, ready to react and reconsider its manner of belonging to the world.

    Pierre-Yves Brest, October 2009

    Looking right then left... then right again
    Read the text | Back to gallery

    Looking right then left... then right again
    Looking right then left... then right again

    Regarder à gauche à droite puis de nouveau à gauche  #1

    Looking right then left... then right again
    Looking right then left... then right again

    Regarder à gauche à droite puis de nouveau à gauche  #2

    Looking right then left... then right again
    Looking right then left... then right again

    Regarder à gauche à droite puis de nouveau à gauche  #3

    Looking right then left... then right again
    Looking right then left... then right again

    Regarder à gauche à droite puis de nouveau à gauche  #4

    Looking right then left... then right again
    Looking right then left... then right again

    Regarder à gauche à droite puis de nouveau à gauche  #5

    Looking right then left, then right again
    Looking right then left, then right again

    Regarder à gauche à droite puis de nouveau à gauche  #6

    Looking right then left... then right again
    Looking right then left... then right again

    Regarder à gauche à droite puis de nouveau à gauche  #7

    Looking right then left... then right again
    Looking right then left... then right again

    Regarder à gauche à droite puis de nouveau à gauche  #8

    Looking right then left... then right again
    Looking right then left... then right again

    Regarder à gauche à droite puis de nouveau à gauche  #9

    Looking right then left... then right again
    Looking right then left... then right again

    Regarder à gauche à droite puis de nouveau à gauche  #10

    Looking right then left... then right again
    Looking right then left... then right again

    Regarder à gauche à droite puis de nouveau à gauche  #12

    Looking right then left... then right again
    Looking right then left... then right again

    Regarder à gauche à droite puis de nouveau à gauche  #13

    Vue de l'exposition à la Centurion Box Gallery de Douvres, 2009
    Vue de l'exposition à la Centurion Box Gallery de Douvres, 2009

    Exposition Résider Reside

    # 2

    Vue de l'exposition à la gare de Saint-Omer, 2009
    Vue de l'exposition à la gare de Saint-Omer, 2009

    Exposition Résider Reside

    #1

    Vue de l'exposition à la gare de Saint-Omer, 2009
    Vue de l'exposition à la gare de Saint-Omer, 2009

    Exposition Résider Reside

    #1

    Vue de l'exposition "Achemar" à la gare Saint-Sauveur, Lille, 2014
    Vue de l'exposition "Achemar" à la gare Saint-Sauveur, Lille, 2014

    This series has been shot during my residency at Espace 36 (Saint-Omer - F) and DAD (Dover Arts Development, GB)

    Size 100 x 123 cm

     

    - The narrow strip of sea which forms the Channel captures the imagination ... invoking a feeling that is  somewhere between dreaming, hope and anxiety.

    - Walkers out for the day, tourists, inhabitants, migrants, sports fans or commuters, each with their aspirations and desires when looking across from the French or English coast: making out the other side, going there, settling there, reconstructing oneself there ... residing there

    - The title of the series alludes to the instructions at pedestrian crossings and invokes at the same time the act of crossing, its risks, its dangers, but also its pleasures.

    - The photographs show men and women of different ages and origins, from both sides of the Channel, indoors, next to a window, facing a net curtain, a marine horizon...

    - The photographs are not portraits but anonymous figures placed according to a protocol for the shoot: a set distance from the subject placed with his or her back to the photographer or in profile, facing an opening which lets in the light, slow shutter speed, low, frontal viewpoint ...

    - Each image is both autonomous and part of a series. The whole series itself forms a single image, all-encompasing, multiple, monumental and more complex. It reveals a diverse, silent human community brought together for an instant in front of a large imaginary window: an artificial panorama opening out beyond the cliffs of Kent and the Pas-de-Calais.

    - The anonymous figures are observed observers of invisible events located out-of-field, beyond the window and outside the frame. They invite us to enter into and become part of the group, to discover that which the photograph refuses to deliver ... and puts us in turn into the position of witness or dreamer.

    - The silence of the images disturbs our own silence. The whole series contains a hint of suspicion.

    - Certain elements and details keep catching the gaze: the incisive cut of a T-shirt sleeve, a lamp turned on in full daylight, a Palestinian  Kaffiyeh used as a belt, a western scarf sketching out the rolling of a turban, an  artificial landscape on a computer screen, the crossing of feet, a ring ... a big net curtain hung outdoors.

    - Real and imaginary, closeness and remoteness, colour and monochrome, permanently cohabit in the individual photographic images and in the series.

    - The net curtain present in many of the photographs can be perceived as a setting, a filter, an artifice of the photographer ... or all three at the same time. It can be seen as making up the fittings inside a home, a museum ... or it could have been taken along by the photographer himself, discreetly, illusively, visibly  or whimsically.

    - The rare visual escape routes beyond the sphere of the interior are reserved for subjects who are disenfranchised, namely migrants destined to the roving and violence of exile.

    - The images allow us to guess at intimate lives sometimes chosen and achieved, sometimes endured; ranging from western comfort to the experience of alternative lifestyles and states of wandering. They bring into appearance the dissonant hues of outdated and enveloping harmonies. Everything nonetheless works together and forms only a single image.

    - “Looking right then left, then right again” suggests a world of the present; a society which is transient, suspicious and anxious about itself, but also a community that is silent, alert, knowing, ready to react and reconsider its manner of belonging to the world.

    Pierre-Yves Brest, October 2009